How to Shop for a Fall Sweater That Flatters Every Shape

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15 tips for finding the perfect women's fall sweater from fashion expert Amy GoodmanIt may seem like summer just ended, but savvy shoppers get their fall sweaters before the selection is picked over—and a chill is in the air. Here are 15 tips to keep in mind when shopping for a basic sweater, from Wear This, Toss That! Hundreds of Fashion and Beauty Swaps That Save Your Looks, Save Your Budget & Save You Time, by style expert Amy E. Goodman.

KEEP
•    A medium-weight fabric that’s neither too bulky for a big chest nor too thin for a flat chest

•    A neckline that doesn’t crowd your face

•    A belted style if you have a generous bust or hips, to add definition at your waist

•    Unique prints, embroidery, sequins, asymmetrical necklines

•    Details that hide your weaknesses. Flat chested? Look for embellishment around the boobs. Big tummy? Go for a more open neckline to draw attention toward the face

•    Affordable, trendy sweaters from mass retailers to boost your wardrobe for one season

•    A variety of staples: thinner fabrics to layer under a blazer; medium-weight, hand-knitted threads for warmth; standalone twinsets

TOSS
•    Heavy appliqués, such as seasonal Christmas trees, pumpkins, autumn leaves, or braided embroidery, that weigh a sweater down

•    Any sweater with blinking lights attached to a battery pack

•    “Wire hanger” shoulders

•    Shapeless sweaters

•    Overly fuzzy fabrics like angora that shed

•    Thin fabrics that cling to stomach rolls

•    Thick fabrics that bunch up under arms or at waist

•     Overly chunky, overly detailed, heavy knit sweater that makes you look “stuffed” like after Thanksgiving dinner, with an unattractive zip funnel neck.

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Carolyn Dalgliesh is the founder and owner of Systems for Sensory Kids and Simple Organizing Strategies, helping sensory families, individuals, and businesses get organized. She is a member of the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) and also serves on the Board of Governors for Bradley Hospital, a neuropsychiatric hospital for children and adolescents. Carolyn lives in Rhode Island with her husband and two children. Visit TheSensoryChildGetsOrganized.com.

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