3 Ways to Tie a Necktie: Windsor, Half Windsor, Four-in-Hand Knots

Emily Lyman has a penchant for organization and ruthlessly keeps only those things that bring her joy. Her life goals are to travel always, read everything, and perfect the selfie. Because let's be honest, posing for a selfie is really the most awkward feeling one can have while taking a photo.

necktieAlright, gentlemen. Expand your knot-ledge. These three ways to tie a necktie should have a permanent home in your fashion repertoire. Ladies, make sure your men read this before they take you out to that swanky dinner. In The Art of Manliness Brett and Kate McKay have created a collection of the most useful advice every man needs to know to live life to its full potential.

 

It’s a sad fact, but there are grown men who don’t know how to tie a necktie. If they have a big interview that afternoon, they’ll go shopping for a clip-on. Even if a man does know how to tie a tie, their knowledge is often limited to just one knot. But there are several ways to tie a necktie. Certain knots should be used with certain shirt collars and tie fabric materials to get the best results for your appearance. Below, we show you three classic necktie knots every man should know and give you the lowdown on when you should use them.

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THE WINDSOR KNOT
The Windsor knot gives you a wide triangular knot that’s good for more formal settings. This knot is best worn with a wide spread collar.

1. Drape the tie around your neck. The wide end should extend about 12 inches below the narrow end of the tie. Cross the wide part of the tie over the narrow end.
2. Bring the wide end of the tie up through the hole between your collar and the tie. Then pull it down toward the front.
3. Bring the wide end behind the narrow end and to the right.
4. Pull the wide end back through the loop again. You should have a triangle now where the knot will be.
5. Wrap the wide end around the triangle by pulling the wide end from right to left.
6. Bring the wide end up through the loop a third time.
7. Pull the wide end through the knot in front.
8. Tighten the knot and center it with both hands.

THE HALF WINDSOR KNOT
This is the Windsor knot’s little brother. Like the Windsor, you’re left with a symmetrical triangle knot, but the Half Windsor is not as large. This knot is appropriate for lighter fabrics and wider ties. It’s best worn with a standard collar.

1. Drape the tie around your neck. The wide end should extend about 12 inches below the narrow end of the tie. Cross the wide part of the tie over the narrow end.
2. Bring the wide end around and behind the narrow end.
3. Bring the wide end up and pull it down through the hole between your collar and tie.
4. Bring the wide end around the front, over the narrow end from right to left.
5. Bring the wide end up back through the loop again.
6. Pull the wide end down through the knot in front.
7. Tighten the knot and center it with both hands.

THE FOUR-IN-HAND KNOT
Also known as the “schoolboy,” this is probably the most widely used knot because it’s so easy to tie. It’s a good knot to use if your tie is made of heavier material. It looks best with smaller spread collars.

1. Drape the tie around your neck. The wide end should extend about 12 inches below the narrow end of the tie. Cross the wide THE GENTLEMAN 15 part of the tie over the narrow end.
2. Turn the wide end back underneath the narrow end.
3. Continue wrapping the wide end around the narrow end by bringing it across the front of the narrow end again.
4. Pull the wide end up and through the back of the loop.
5. Hold the front of the knot with your index finger and bring the wide end down through the front knot.
6. Tighten the knot carefully to the gills by holding the narrow end and sliding the knot up. Center the knot.

Now that the men are taken care of…ladies, here are three fashion rules for a first date.

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