Beat Procrastination with Endurance Exercise

Dr. Sharad P. Paul, MD is a skin cancer surgeon, family physician, academic, skincare expert, evolutionary biologist, storyteller, and social entrepreneur, as well as an adjunct professor at Aukland University of Technology. Born in England, with a childhood in India, he is a global citizen who lives Down Under. In 2003, he received a Health Innovation Award and in 2008, was featured in international editions of Time. He has been called a Renaissance Man by New Zealand Herald’s Canvas magazine and a polymath by Good magazine. In 2012, he was awarded the New Zealand Medical Association’s highest honor, the Chair’s Award. He has spoken at ideas conferences like THiNK alongside Robert De Niro, Tina Brown, David Barash, and V.S. Naipaul. He recently won the acclaimed Ko Awatea International Excellence in Health Improvement Award for Leading Health Improvement on a Global Scale.

exercise for procrastinationModern human tendencies toward movement are a result of the expression of our genes. With today’s trends and technologies, many find themselves in a state of fatigued movement–a factor contributing greatly to procrastination. To overcome procrastination and this overall sluggishness, we must force our bodies (and, more importantly, our genes) into a state of motion. Learn more from Dr. Sharad Paul in his book, The Genetics of Health: Understand Your Genes for Better Health.

 

Genetics tells us that genes are just as selfish as we are, even if evolution tries its darnedest not to make such things obvious. As humans became two legged, there were more reasons to move, and a larger brain evolved—full of brutishness, ego, and industrial zeal. But as more and more automation comes about, we seek to make things easier for humankind and move less, forgetting the reason for our brains becoming bigger in the first place. Therefore, unlike wild animals, our human populations have become fatter and fatter, and our muscles weaker and weaker. And, increasingly, it is obvious that all our visual and balance systems were optimized to make us modern humans upright and two legged. With the increasing use of cell phones, everyone you pass on the street seems hunched over their mobile devices, a sort of reverse evolution, the appearance of Homo mobilensis, a new species of man designed with the optimum body shape to work computers.

The Genetics of Health

The Genetics of Health

by Sharad P. Paul

  • Get The Genetics of Health
  • Get The Genetics of Health
  • Get The Genetics of Health

So, rather than being fun, movement has become a pain in the ass or something that must be forced upon us. Guess who modulated this slippery slope to slothfulness? Genes. All right, not particular genes, but several “gene associations,” territories in genetic wastelands where disease-linked genes live in clusters. If you ask me, these are evolutionary excuses. What movement for movement’s sake, like dance, has shown us is that we are still guinea pigs in an evolutionary lab. We could stop dancing, but then we’d end up having to depend on luck. No self-respecting species does things like that.

While you can certainly squeeze in opportunities for simple exercise during your daily routine, it may be time to think about becoming a gym member. But don’t panic we can help you figure out that transition, and how to find the right gym for you.

More Stories >